I’ve often mentioned LinkedIn as a vital part of my cold emailing process. Without it, I wouldn’t be able to form that initial connection with the other person that ends up turning into a real conversation about working together.

But sometimes, LinkedIn is enough in and of itself.

In fact, it was through LinkedIn that I landed a $900/month client a few years back, and they’re still with me. And here’s the best part: They reached out to me.

Furthermore, they’re in what was my initial niche(s): fitness and nutrition.

It doesn’t get much better than this.

It wasn’t an accident, though. There’s a reason this client tracked me down and not another professional. Here’s what I did to tip the odds in my favor.

How LinkedIn Landed Me a $900/Month Client

1. I Got Really Specific

My profile doesn’t just say that I’m a writer. It says exactly what kind of writer I am: a fitness, nutrition, and digital marketing writer.

megan grant linkedin profile

This made it easier for my client to find and select me. He wasn’t looking for just any professional. He wanted one familiar with fitness and nutrition. By including those words in my headline, I significantly reduced my competition. There are tons of writers. There are far fewer fitness and nutrition writers.

How to Copy It

If you haven’t picked a niche yet, watch this first.

Once you have your niche, clarify it in your LinkedIn profile headline. For example, instead of putting “Graphic Designer,” put “Medical Graphic Designer.” Instead of “Social Media Manager,” put “Real Estate Social Media Manager.” Or instead of “Web Designer,” put “Finance Web Designer.”

Get specific.

2. I Proved That I Can Deliver Results

A lot of people can talk the talk. But can you walk the walk?

When I’m trying to land a new client, there’s one thing I make damn sure to do: prove I can deliver results.

As opposed to simply claiming I can do this on my LinkedIn profile, I went one step further and posted screenshots.

blog analytics
blog insights

Of course, there’s no identifying information, so those two clients stay anonymous.

I added these under Experience, where I list myself as the founder of my digital marketing agency.

How to Copy It

Tracking and measuring the results you deliver is vital if you want to deliver good results, so I hope that you’re already doing that.

If you’re a social media manager, you can get insights from the individual platforms (Facebook, Instagram, etc.) as well as Google Analytics.

If you’re a writer, Google Analytics and Google Search Console are excellent, as are tools like SEMrush and Moz.

For web developers, you can also turn to something like Google Analytics to see how the websites you build are performing.

Grab a few screenshots — making sure to avoid or blur out any revealing information — and publish those on your LinkedIn profile.

3. I Optimized My Profile to Make it Keyword-Rich

Maybe you’ve heard me talk about this before. LinkedIn works like a search engine — like Google.

In a nutshell, this means that you can rank higher in LinkedIn search results by optimizing your profile page. How do you do that, you ask? By including one main keyword throughout your whole page, plus sprinkling in other relevant keywords.

The words “fitness” and “nutrition” appear several times on my page, as do other related words. Check out my About section.

linkedin about section

I’m very intentional with what I include here, words like CrossFit, bodybuilding, keto diet, and paleo diet.

Additionally, since I do a lot of work with brands in the digital marketing field, I include words like blogging, email marketing, and search engine optimization/SEO. This is all on purpose!

How to Copy It

Sit down and make a list of keywords that are relevant to the work you do. For example, if your niche is real estate, related words might be:

  • Commercial real estate
  • Residential real estate
  • Real estate agents
  • Realtors

If you create any sort of content for parents, relevant words for you might be:

  • Parenting
  • Motherhood
  • Pregnancy
  • Maternity

Use these keywords throughout the entirety of your profile, including your About section and under Experience.

A word of caution, though. Treat LinkedIn as you would treat Google when it comes to keyword stuffing — as in, don’t do it.

These three things played a huge role in landing my client, and LinkedIn continues to be an invaluable tool to me, to this day. Use it wisely!

If you want more help with landing clients using LinkedIn, fill out the form below and I’ll send you my free guide.